Posted in art, poetry, writing

Addicted to Disney

Addicted to DisneyThis one’s an oldie. I just watched Mirror Mirror, a silly take on Snow White starring Lily Collins and Julia Roberts, so it seemed like an appropriate throwback. It was published in Pastiche Magazine (a small online journal) last summer during my run as their featured poet for the month of July. It’s strange to look back at previous writings. It’s hard not to judge myself and also bittersweet to experience the emotions from a distance, especially poems that dive into dark scary places I never want to visit again. I think it’s important to look back though and see how far I’ve grown in so many aspects of my self and my work.

A question to my fellow writers:

Do you ever look back at old work and do you find it difficult to look at it objectively?

Oh, and follow me on Twitter. …please.

Advertisements

Author:

Poetry and music.

13 thoughts on “Addicted to Disney

  1. I really like this. I think you summed up the feelings of many young women. As far as looking back at old work and judging it objectively: I guess I do find it difficult, to a certain extent. I feel like I should find it immature and pretty lousy, but it always turns out to be better than I expected it, which is good, but it makes me feel like I’m missing something.

    1. Thank you! And I agree with you. I’m often surprised by old work. Sure, some of it I want to hide in a closet and never show anyone but some of it withstands the test of time. A couple years ago I found a poem I’d written in high school and in all honesty, I was mildly impressed with 15 year old me.

      1. Have you ever read Emily of New Moon by L.M. Montgomery? I just finished it, and it’s fabulous. One of the best parts is in the last chapter, when her teacher critiques 13yo Emily’s poetry. I have a feeling that you could relate.

  2. great story, but dreams are what the world are made of, the better we dream, the better we become, it’s self fulfilling, anyway, everyone believes in fairy tales, amen

  3. Sometimes I run across old writings of mine and usually have one of two reactions: 1) I can’t believe I wrote this. I hope no one actually read it, or didn’t associate my name with it if they did!
    2) Wow! This is pretty good! I really do have a gift worth sharing! I want to do more!
    I guess that’s the stereotypical emotion of a writer. As long as I don’t listen too well to either voice, I’m okay. Still, it can be revealing to where my true pleasure in writing is found and an encouragement to pursue that more than the other.
    Thanks for another enjoyable, relate-able “read”. 🙂

    1. I think that falling somewhere between the two is ideal, but I find my self-judgment changes daily about such things. I’ve even had days when I regret my poem hours after posting yet other times I fall in love with what I’ve written. As always, thanks for reading. I love your comments!

  4. so true, heartbreakingly true… and very well written. I like your poetry, it may not be prose, sickly sweet, but so dead on true it’s DEEP! keep writing!! in my day, it was stupid Harliquin romance novels, they’re enough to make you sick. lol there are no princes out there, their is only percentages…so if you find a man who is only a stupid moron 10% of the time, snag him…. you’re doing good!!! hahahaha

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s